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Significance of the Nomaoi Festival after 3.11 in Fukushima: Enactment and Reenactment by Nobuko Adachi

This piece is part of the JAWS online series of Reflections from Tōhoku. How have the residents of the Hamadōri coastal area of Fukushima normalized their daily lives after the 3.11 earthquake, tsunami, and nuclear disaster?  I consider this by examining an “intangible cultural asset,” an annual traditional ceremony called the Soma Nomaoi Cavalry Festival, which has been held in the area for close to a millennium. Since 3.11, Japan’s northeast coast Fukushima residents have had their normal daily lives transformed, and suffering of all types has been rampant, including mental health problems, social upheaval, and financial distress. According to

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Waste & Wonder – Reflecting My Fieldwork in Fukushima by Dunja Sharbat Dar

This piece is the fourth part in the JAWS online series of Reflections from Tōhoku   “This is Namie. It’s now a ghost town”, said the tour guide as the bus stopped and we got off. An eerie silence filled the streets as we walked through Namie town, a town whose residents had had to evacuate in the wake of the Fukushima nuclear disaster in 2011. Although the houses looked intact, we knew that the place would remain empty and lonely for years to come. Cars were parked at the road, untouched and dusty. I peeked around a corner and

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”He’s a sengyōshufu” – female fieldworker’s reflections on gendered disaster recovery By Pilvi Posio

This piece is the fourth part in the JAWS online series of Reflections from Tōhoku   “And what does your husband do while you’re doing the research?” “He’s a full-time house-husband (sengyōshufu, pronunciation the same as full-time housewife)”   For my research into long-term community reconstruction after the 3.11 during my PhD, I conducted field research for a period of eight months in the town of Yamamoto in Tohoku in 2014–2015. While my research required actual travel from home to a distant field, the heydays of presenting the heroic ventures of a solitary fieldworker in ethnographic tradition are long gone.

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Significance of the Nomaoi Festival after 3.11 in Fukushima: Enactment and Reenactment by Nobuko Adachi

This piece is part of the JAWS online series of Reflections from Tōhoku. How have the residents of the Hamadōri coastal area of Fukushima normalized their daily lives after the 3.11 earthquake, tsunami, and nuclear disaster?  I consider this by examining an “intangible cultural asset,” an annual traditional ceremony called the Soma Nomaoi Cavalry Festival, ... Read more

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”He’s a sengyōshufu” – female fieldworker’s reflections on gendered disaster recovery By Pilvi Posio

This piece is the fourth part in the JAWS online series of Reflections from Tōhoku   “And what does your husband do while you’re doing the research?” “He’s a full-time house-husband (sengyōshufu, pronunciation the same as full-time housewife)”   For my research into long-term community reconstruction after the 3.11 during my PhD, I conducted field ... Read more

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